Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 92

Thread: HISTORICAL ADVENTURES, Due July 26, 2019

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    12,588
    Gallery Count
    136
    Comment Count
    310
    Post Thanks / Like
    I think this swap idea is super creative. Sign me up. You know you are getting train cards from me.

  2. Thanks Vicki Z thanked this post
    Likes Ancient Planter liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Welcome CastleQueen5.
    I signed you up.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Medford, OR
    Posts
    822
    Gallery Count
    115
    Comment Count
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    You mentioned the chimneys on the Clemens home, and I had to go and check - yup, forgot to include all the chimneys on the buildings at Bletchley! That was one of the reasons I took the photo - fascinated with all the chimneys and architecture! So that one's been changed slightly to add the chimneys and put a little more paint here and there. And instead of mailing copies of the original photos along with them, I'll just go ahead and post the photos here, if you don't mind. If you do mind, let me know and I'll remove them

    Attachment 207109

    Attachment 207110

    Attachment 207111

    Attachment 207112 - That's Alan in the blue coat. Visiting Bletchley was part of the Road Scholar trip we were on: A History of Spying, concentrating mostly on WWII. I can't remember the guy's name who led it, Nigel something. He's a rather famous author of WWII spy novels and a former MP in England.

    Most of our vacations have something to do with history somehow. Just call us history nerds.
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

  5. Thanks Vicki Z thanked this post
    Likes Vicki Z liked this post
  6. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    12,588
    Gallery Count
    136
    Comment Count
    310
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Planter View Post
    You mentioned the chimneys on the Clemens home, and I had to go and check - yup, forgot to include all the chimneys on the buildings at Bletchley! That was one of the reasons I took the photo - fascinated with all the chimneys and architecture! So that one's been changed slightly to add the chimneys and put a little more paint here and there. And instead of mailing copies of the original photos along with them, I'll just go ahead and post the photos here, if you don't mind. If you do mind, let me know and I'll remove them

    Attachment 207109

    Attachment 207110

    Attachment 207111

    Attachment 207112 - That's Alan in the blue coat. Visiting Bletchley was part of the Road Scholar trip we were on: A History of Spying, concentrating mostly on WWII. I can't remember the guy's name who led it, Nigel something. He's a rather famous author of WWII spy novels and a former MP in England.

    Most of our vacations have something to do with history somehow. Just call us history nerds.
    I like those chimneys too!!!

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Planter View Post
    Instead of mailing copies of the original photos along with them, I'll just go ahead and post the photos here, if you don't mind.
    If you do mind, let me know and I'll remove them

    DO NOT REMOVE THE PHOTOS
    LOVE, LOVE, LOVE THEM,
    And I know others would like to see how you created your wonderful watercolors from your phenomenal photography
    Last edited by Vicki Z; 06-01-2019 at 11:21 AM.

  8. Thanks Ancient Planter thanked this post
  9. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Medford, OR
    Posts
    822
    Gallery Count
    115
    Comment Count
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Love your Leif Erikson, Vicki! I had a history prof. in college who was Norwegian decent and he was adamant about teaching us that Leif was the first European to set foot here, NOT Columbus. I don't remember anything else about his class, but I do remember him standing in front of us and being practically angry about Columbus getting the fame over "discovering" America.
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

  10. Thanks Vicki Z thanked this post
    Likes Vicki Z liked this post
  11. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Planter View Post
    Love your Leif Erikson, Vicki! I had a history prof. in college who was Norwegian decent and he was adamant about teaching us that Leif was the first European to set foot here, NOT Columbus. I don't remember anything else about his class, but I do remember him standing in front of us and being practically angry about Columbus getting the fame over "discovering" America.

    Thanks.
    I apparently had a similar teacher, because I got the same lecture, and never forgot it.

    Oddly, this is NOT a new concept.
    There was a 1874 book called "America Not Discovered by Columbus" by Norwegian-American Rasmus B. Anderson that presented the idea that vikings were the first Europeans in the New World. Also, this concept was all but verified as true in 1960. But history is difficult to change, especially when one has to re-write the history books.

  12. Likes Ancient Planter liked this post
  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    12,588
    Gallery Count
    136
    Comment Count
    310
    Post Thanks / Like
    I found a postage stamp, a very old one with Old Faithful on it. That is a fun place to visit. Yellowstone.

    LITTLE KNOWN FACTS ABOUT OLD FAITHFUL
    Old Faithful was the first named geyser in Yellowstone.
    Despite popular belief, the geyser doesn’t erupt every hour on the hour. It currently erupts every 91 minutes on average.
    You can download an app that gives you the approximate time of Old Faithful’s next eruption.
    In the early days of the park, people sometimes used the geyser to wash their clothes. Explorers and other visitors would throw their clothes into the geyser between eruptions and wait for them to be shot back out, thoroughly clean. According to reports, woolen garments did not fare well, but other types of fabrics seemed to do just fine.
    The water that erupts from Old Faithful has been measured at 204° F while the temperature of escaping steam can be hotter than 350° F.

  14. Likes ksj1717, Ancient Planter liked this post
  15. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Medford, OR
    Posts
    822
    Gallery Count
    115
    Comment Count
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    I keep painting more and more "historic adventures" that we've had over the last few years... I believe I've got 10 done now. Will have to choose which to send for the swap In the meantime, here are the latest:

    Attachment 207352 - Seattle's Space Needle... the Jetson's home was modeled on this! Built for the 1962 World's Fair.

    Attachment 207353 - Old Slave Block, Sharpsburg, MD. Supposedly used as a slave auction block, and a landmark at the original location for over 150 years. It's now thought it may have actually been a carriage block for the home that sat on the site now occupied by a gas station.

    Attachment 207354 - Sachs Bridge, Gettysburg, PA. The Confederates retreated over this bridge after the battle ended, and many died on the riverbanks nearby, many drowning as the river rose when the rain started. It's haunted and I had my own ghostly experiences here.
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

  16. Thanks Vicki Z thanked this post
    Likes CastleQueen5, Vicki Z liked this post
  17. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Medford, OR
    Posts
    822
    Gallery Count
    115
    Comment Count
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Attachment 207355 - Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA. You can see his original paintings here, and on the grounds is also his studio.

    Attachment 207356 - John Hancock Wharf & Warehouse, York, ME. Briefly owned by Hancock in the 1790s, it's the earliest surviving wharf and warehouse from York's colonial period.

    Attachment 207357 - Catherine Blaikley House, Williamsburg, VA. Catherine Kaidyee Blaikley was a midwife in Williamsburg until she died in 1771, and delivered upwards of 3,000 babies. Her husband died in 1736 and Catherine raised their children, supporting herself and them in one of the few occupations open to women at the time. She made a good living and is buried in Bruton Parish Church, which is just about across the street from her house. She's also my 6x great-grandmother.
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

  18. Thanks Vicki Z thanked this post
    Likes Vicki Z, LucyMc liked this post
  19. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Friendsville, Tennessee
    Posts
    1,837
    Gallery Count
    12
    Comment Count
    36
    Post Thanks / Like
    Cool stuff, Ancient Planter!

  20. Thanks Ancient Planter thanked this post
  21. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    HISTORIC ADVENTURES

    Attachment 207358
    The Arc de Triomphe (1806)
    Built by Emperor Napoleon I of France
    The Arc de Triomphe is recognized around the globe as a major symbol of Parisian pomp and elegance. Started by the Emperor Napoleon I in 1806 to commemorate France's military prowess (and the proud ruler himself), the arch is a 50-meter/164 foot tall decorated arch on the west end of the Champs-Elysées, the city's most iconic avenue, at the juncture known as the Place de l’Etoile (the star), where 12 prestigious avenues radiate out in a semi-circular pattern.
    .....Walk under the Arc de Triomphe
    ......Learn more about the Arc de Triomphe, either on line or in person
    .....Trip to France

    Trivia:
    Many famous victory marches have led past the Arc de Triomphe including the Germans in 1871, the French in 1918, the Germans again in 1940 and the French and the Allies in 1944 and 1945.
    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I rests beneath the Arc.
    The Arc contains the first eternal flame lit in Western Europe since the Vestal Virgins’ fire was extinguished in the year 391. Begun on Armistice Day 1920, it burns in memory of the dead who were never identified in both World War I and World War II.


    Attachment 207359

    The Opera Garnier in Paris (1875)
    First housing the Opera, now home of the Paris Ballet
    Seating 2,200 people, the imposing Opera Garnier in Paris—also known as the Palais Garnier or simply the Paris Opera—is an architectural treasure in the neo-baroque style. It is the home of the Paris Ballet. The city's official opera company relocated to the more contemporary Opera Bastille in 1989
    .....Go to the Opera
    .....Catch a Ballet Performance
    .....Learn more about the Opera Garnier, either on line or in person
    .....Trip to Paris
    Last edited by Vicki Z; 07-31-2019 at 01:22 AM.

  22. Likes ksj1717, Ancient Planter liked this post
  23. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Attachment 207379

    Colosseum AD 72 - AD 80
    Largest Amphitheater ever built, Rome, Italy
    The Colosseum is an oval amphitheater in the center of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of travertine, tuff, and brick-faced concrete, it is the largest amphitheater ever built. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72 and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir, Titus.
    The Colosseum could hold, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, having an average audience of some 65,000. It was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles (for only a short time as the hypogeum was soon filled in with mechanisms to support the other activities), animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era. It was later reused for such purposes as housing, workshops, quarters for a religious order, a fortress, a quarry, and a Christian shrine. Each Good Friday the Pope leads a torchlit "Way of the Cross" procession that starts in the area around the Colosseum. In 2018, it was the most popular tourist attraction in the world, with 7.4 million visitors.
    .....Research the science of building with mortar and concrete to make a building that lasts for centeries
    .....Learn more about the Colosseum, either on line or in person
    .....Trip to Rome

    Trivia:
    Without the use of microphones, amplifiers, or any electrical assistance, sounds reaches every corner of the Italian Colosseum, built 72 - 80 AD
    Last edited by Vicki Z; 07-31-2019 at 01:20 AM.

  24. Likes Ancient Planter liked this post
  25. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Medford, OR
    Posts
    822
    Gallery Count
    115
    Comment Count
    125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mine will be in tomorrow's mail
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

  26. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Planter View Post
    Mine will be in tomorrow's mail
    Thanks for letting me know.
    I will watch for them.
    It will be interesting to see which one of the many you created you sent.

  27. Likes Ancient Planter liked this post
  28. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    195
    Gallery Count
    0
    Comment Count
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    SPECTACTULAR CARDS, everyone.
    Please sign me up.

  29. Thanks Vicki Z thanked this post
  30. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Welcome Boots.
    I signed you up.

  31. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Somerset, UK
    Posts
    1,137
    Gallery Count
    452
    Comment Count
    379
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Ancient Planter View Post
    VAGINAL GLOW STICKS!?!?! I actually first read that as vaginal GLUE sticks! Yikes!!

    Donnacr - I look forward to seeing some Australian historic events!!

    I got busy on this one and painted some of my photos from our vacations:

    Attachment 207103 - Witch House, Salem MA

    Attachment 207104 - 150th Anniversary, Gettysburg PA (Alan was on the field in this one )

    Attachment 207105 - Samuel Clemens Home, Hartford CT (it's haunted, but the guide told me the ghosts were always kind with her. She thinks it's Sam's daughter or wife)

    Attachment 207106 - Bletchley Park, England

    I hope these are what you're thinking of for "Historical Adventures" Vicki!
    These are superb. Especially loving The Witch House, Salem and Bletchley Park.
    IMPORTANT ... All overseas traders - please make sure all envelopes are well taped up as I've had some arrived torn
    Love to trade!
    Sometimes I go quiet ... I have fibromyalgia and it can limit my creativity at times

  32. Thanks Ancient Planter thanked this post
  33. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,440
    Gallery Count
    146
    Comment Count
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    FAB cards received from Leydab.
    Thanks for including a hostie card.

  34. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    France and USA
    Posts
    1,029
    Gallery Count
    19
    Comment Count
    44
    Post Thanks / Like
    You really know how to lure me in with Paris atcs. I am highly considering joining. not committed yet but maybe soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicki Z View Post
    HISTORIC ADVENTURES

    Attachment 207358
    The Arc de Triomphe (1806)
    Built by Emperor Napoleon I of France
    The Arc de Triomphe is recognized around the globe as a major symbol of Parisian pomp and elegance. Started by the Emperor Napoleon I in 1806 to commemorate France's military prowess (and the proud ruler himself), the arch is a 50-meter/164 foot tall decorated arch on the west end of the Champs-Elysées, the city's most iconic avenue, at the juncture known as the Place de l’Etoile (the star), where 12 prestigious avenues radiate out in a semi-circular pattern.
    .....Walk under the Arc de Triomphe
    ......Learn more about the Arc de Triomphe, either on line or in person
    .....Trip to France

    Trivia:
    Many famous victory marches have led past the Arc de Triomphe including the Germans in 1871, the French in 1918, the Germans again in 1940 and the French and the Allies in 1944 and 1945.
    The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I rests beneath the Arc.
    The Arc contains the first eternal flame lit in Western Europe since the Vestal Virgins’ fire was extinguished in the year 391. Begun on Armistice Day 1920, it burns in memory of the dead who were never identified in both World War I and World War II.


    Attachment 207359

    The Opera Garnier in Paris (1875)
    First housing the Opera, now home of the Paris Ballet
    Seating 2,200 people, the imposing Opera Garnier in Paris—also known as the Palais Garnier or simply the Paris Opera—is an architectural treasure in the neo-baroque style. It is the home of the Paris Ballet. The city's official opera company relocated to the more contemporary Opera Bastille in 1989
    .....Go to the Opera
    .....Catch a Ballet Performance
    .....Learn more about the Opera Garnier, either on line or in person
    .....Trip to Paris

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •